Make your own Tilapia Feed

Make your own Tilapia feed

This is a children’s book from The Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture. The Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture (CTSA) is one of five regional aquaculture centers in the United States established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The regional aquaculture centers integrate individual and institutional expertise and resources in support of commercial aquaculture development. CTSA was established in 1986 and is jointly administered by the Oceanic Institute and the University of Hawaii. The CTSA administrative office and staff are located at the Oceanic Institute’s Makapu’u Point site on windward Oahu.

Recipe #1
(from Aquariacentral.com)

Ingredients:

2 lbs. whole shrimp
8 oz Salmon
1 lb frozen peas
1 lb frozen spinach
1 small bag of mini carrots
1 medium zucchini
¼ cup spirulina powder
6 centrum vitamins
120 grams unsweetened gelatin powder
Procedure:

Steam carrots and zucchini until soft but not mushy. Remove from heat, strain and set aside. Prepare shrimp by removing its tails, rinse. Cut salmon into small cubes. Dissolve the vitamins in water. Add all ingredients in the blender and grind into a mush. Set aside.

In a pan, cook gelatin under low heat. Slowly pour the blended mixture into the gelatin. Stir well for about 2-3 minutes. Put the mixture in ice cube trays and place in the refrigerator. When the gelatin sets, you can put these into vacuum sealed bags or zip locks for easy storage.

If you’re keeping a Putter Fish or an Oscar, which are carnivorous, then you might want to replace the veggies with frozen shrimp, beef heart (without the fats) or salmon.

Recipe #2
(from Aquacon.com)

Ingredients:

Fruits and vegetables like carrots, broccoli, yams, oranges, apples, Romaine lettuce, etc.
Shrimp and crab legs (with shells)
Procedure:

Put all ingredients in a blender and mix into a mush. You may add some liquid like carrot or sweet potato juice or just plain water if it appears too thick. Set aside.

Next, boil 100-150 ml of water and add unflavored gelatin. Mix the gelatin and vegetable mixture together. Pour the mixture into a pan and store in refrigerator. When the mixture hardens, you can place them in small bags for use as needed.

Recipe #3
(from Melevsreef.com)

Ingredients:

Small frozen packs of Mysis, Daphnia, Plankton, Blood worms and Krill (or Spirulina Enriched Brine Shrimp). There are cheaper alternatives like frozen shrimp, squid, cuttlefish, mussel and octopus
Spirulina powder
Procedure:

Cut all ingredients into small pieces. Blend together using a blender or food processor. Place the mixture in a container or small bags and store in refrigerator.

Recipe #4
(from 3reef.com)

Ingredients:

5 raw shrimp (shell removed)
Fresh cod
Fresh Sockeye Salmon
Fresh Tuna
1 pacific mussel
2 clams
1 colossal scallop
Several ounces Mysis shrimp
3 sheets nori
1 stalk of broccoli
¾ bottle of Kent marine garlic extreme
Procedure:

Chop everything into small pieces and mix in blender. Pour in a pan and let cool. Let the mixture harden inside the refrigerator then place in small plastic bags and freeze.

Recipe #5
(from Backyardaquaponics.com)

Ingredients:

Grounded soy bean
Grounded corn
Whole wheat flour
Garlic Powder
Eggs
Dehydrated milk
Azomite
Procedure:

Mix ingredients. Place in oven at 180F for 2-3 hours. The finished product would be similar to a crumble. Place in small bags and freeze.

Improvise
All these recipes can be tweaked as you like. For example, add some flavour by throwing in some blood worms, if your budget permits. Or put in extra vitamin A or lecithin.

Remember, though, that if you decide to prepare fish food yourself, allow for a transition period for your fish to get used to the flavour and consistency of the food. Observe its effect on the fish – is it gobbling up all the food or does it turn away from it after a few bites?

During the transition period, consider your personally-prepared fish food as supplement to regular, commercial fish food. But if you see that your fish can’t get enough of your meals, then you’re on a roll.

You’ll get the fulfillment of being a certified fish food chef as you treat your precious fish to daily feasts.

Share Your Recipes
Have you made your own fish food before? Share your own fish food recipes in the comments section below.

 

http://www.ctsa.org/files/publications/AmerSamoa_ChildrensFeedManual_secure.pdf